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Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of classification of fire effects on the microclimate of forest and tundra ecosystems found in the catalog.

classification of fire effects on the microclimate of forest and tundra ecosystems

W.R Rouse

classification of fire effects on the microclimate of forest and tundra ecosystems

final report

by W.R Rouse

  • 186 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Indian and Northern Affairs in Ottawa .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Forest fires -- Environmental aspects.,
  • Forest microclimatology.,
  • Forest ecology.,
  • Tundra ecology.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementW. R. Rouse, P.F. Mills.
    SeriesEnvironmental studies -- no.2, Environmental studies (Canada. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada) -- no. 2.
    ContributionsMills, P. F.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsSD390.5 R68 1977
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 21 p. :
    Number of Pages21
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14884148M
    ISBN 100662012402

      Progress 10/01/16 to 09/30/17 Outputs OUTPUTS: al forests play an important role in regulating the global climate and the carbon cycle. With the changing temperature and moisture along the elevation gradient, the Luquillo Experimental Forest in Northeastern Puerto Rico provides a natural approach to understand tropical forest ecosystems under climate change. |microclimate, forest ecosystem, landscape ecology, climate, edge effects, temperature, slope, aspect, topography. These authors explore the influence that microclimate has on various ecological processes and how if effects the ecosystem and structure of the landscape.

    Effect of simulated emerald ash borer infestation on nitrogen cycling in black ash (Fraxinus nigra) wetlands in northern Minnesota, USA, Toczydlowski, Alan J. Z., Slesak Robert A., Kolka Randall K., Venterea Rodney T., D'Amato Anthony W., and Palik Brian J., Forest Ecology and Management, Jan, Volume , p, () DOI; Google. Heinselman, M.L. () Fire intensity and frequency as factors in the distribution and structure of northern ecosystems, in Fire Regimes and Ecosystem Properties. Proceedings of the conference. USDA Forest Service General Tech. Rep. WO, pp. 7– Google Scholar.

    Unfortunately, this book can't be printed from the OpenBook. If you need to print pages from this book, we recommend downloading it as a PDF. Visit to get more information about this book, to buy it in print, or to download it as a free PDF. CONTENTS Section Page Executive Summary ES-1 1 Introduction 1 Overview 1 Review of Basic Concepts 3 Classification Systems 3 Ecosystem Services 3 Services in the Market 4 Economic Versus Ecosystem Services 5 General Approach for NESCS 5 Summary of Requirements and Key Features of NESCS 7 Overview of the Report 10 2 Review of Ecosystem .


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Classification of fire effects on the microclimate of forest and tundra ecosystems by W.R Rouse Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. A classification of fire effects on the microclimate of forest and tundra ecosystems: final report. [Wayne R Rouse; P F Mills; Canada.

Indian and Northern Affairs.] -- This study summarizes the microclimatic effects of burning of open subarctic woodland in terms of soil temperature, soil moisture, radiation, evaporation and evapotranspiration. Tundra, a major zone of treeless level or rolling ground found in cold regions, mostly north of the Arctic Circle (Arctic tundra) or above the timberline on high mountains (alpine tundra).

Tundra is known for large stretches of bare ground and rock and for patchy mantles of low vegetation such as mosses, lichens, herbs, and small shrubs. Tundra ecosystems are found in the arctic and on alpine zones of mountains.

Arctic tundra is relatively homogeneous in terms of vegetation structure, with low biodiversity due to its recent glacial history, while alpine tundra is much more diverse, with higher biodiversity mostly because of its fragmentation on isolated mountains.

Tundra is. Fire is a dynamic ecosystem process, generally predictable but uncertain in its timing and occurrence on landscapes [].It is an integral component of most wildland forest ecosystems as well as wild and managed grasslands ().It has been a factor in shaping plant communities for over million years, as long as vegetation and lightning have existed on earth [2, 3, 4, 5].

Microclimate and local climate. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press. DOI: /CBO E-mail Citation» A general overview covering physical and biological processes influencing microclimates. Includes up-to-date summaries of current techniques in microclimate measurement as well as an overview of microclimates and climate change.

Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on cultural resources and archeology. ion publication to the recently published book, Fire’s Effects on Ecosystems by DeBano and others (). In the late s, the USDA Forest Service published productivity of forest ecosystems and the hydrologic functioning of watersheds.

Cumulative File Size: 11MB. The tundra biome is the youngest on the planet, having developed its current structure and geography during the close of the Pleistocene glaciations roug years ago.

Sources of the flora and fauna tend to be much older, with a large number of species deriving from the various mountain chains that ring the Arctic and stretch between the.

Boreal Forest Fire Regimes And Climate Change. predict the effects of climate change on tundra fire regimes, it is critical to have detailed knowledge of the natural frequency and extent of. Climate (from Ancient Greek klima, meaning inclination) is commonly defined as the weather averaged over a long period.

The standard averaging period is 30 years, but other periods may be used depending on the purpose. Climate also includes statistics other than the average, such as the magnitudes of day-to-day or year-to-year variations.

This book explains the structure and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, using examples ranging from the Arctic to the tropics to demonstrate how they react under differing conditions.

This knowledge is developed into a set of principles that can be used as starting points for analysing questions about ecosystem by: We used a literature review to examine responses across disturbance types (i.e.

fire, warming, nutrient addition, drought) and ecosystems (tundra, meadow, forest, peatland). We included studies that examined moss community responses to disturbance as the change in total species richness, total abundance (% cover of moss), and/or net growth by: Brown, James K.; Smith, Jane Kapler, eds.

Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on flora. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTRvol. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. This state-of-knowledge review about the effects of fire on flora and fuels can assist land managersFile Size: 8MB.

Post-fire forest regeneration is strongly influenced by abiotic and biotic heterogeneity in the pre- and post-fire environments, including fire regimes, species characteristics, landforms, hydrology, regional climate, and soil properties.

Assessing these drivers is key to understanding the long-term effects of fire disturbances on forest by: 6. The emerging predominance of western white pine on MD-GNP, especially in mid- and high-elevation stands, resulted from several interacting factors: (1) survival —fires increased in warming climates and with lower levels of higher suppression, and western white pine is better able to survive fire than many other conifer species in the Cited by: White spruce establishment was limited after a "severe" wildfire in the black spruce-white spruce forest-tundra ecotone northeast of Inuvik, Northwest Territories and none of the white spruce that established in the first 5 years after the fire in the acre ( ha) study area survived.

Many physical, chemical, mineralogical, and biological soil properties can be affected by forest fires. The effects are chiefly a result of burn severity, which consists of peak temperatures and.

Microclimate. Even in the complete absence of vegetation, major climatic forces, or macroclimates, are expressed differently at a very local spatial level, which has resulted in the recognition of so-calledthe surface of the ground undergoes the greatest daily variation in temperature, and daily thermal flux is progressively reduced with both increasing distance above and.

Boreal forest is a conifer or conifer-hardwood forest type occurring on moist to dry sites characterized by species dominant in the Canadian boreal forest. It typically occupies upland sites along shores of the Great Lakes, on islands in the Great Lakes, and locally inland.

Modeling: Several fire effects, fuel, and fire behavior models applicable to whitebark pine ecosystems are available at McKenzie and others [ ] provide a model for predicting coarse-scale fire effects in whitebark pine and other potential natural vegetation types of the Columbia River Basin.

These same principles (differences in microclimate and quality of above- and belowground C inputs) also determine the overall effect of vegetation shifts and land use changes in alpine ecosystems, with the encroachment or planting of trees in mountain meadows or tundra systems often resulting in a net loss of soil C.

Detecting the origin of SOC. Sedimentary evidence suggests that O 2 levels have varied greatly in the Phanerozoic. Fire is sensitive to O effects of fire on modern ecosystem structure and on plant morphology are reviewed and used as a basis for predicting how the fossil record might reflect high O 2 fire regimes.

It is observed that fire is a strong agent of natural selection, and that if O 2 has been unstable, the Cited by: - both consider relationships between organisms and environment - bio-geography emphasizes spatial distributions (local and regional scales) and how these change over time (temporal) - focus of bio-geography is primarily on biological/ physical processes but human interactions with the biophysical environment are also addressed.

Biomes are both climatically and geographically defined. Biomes are regions of Earth that have similar climates and other abiotic. abiotic: physical factors or conditions that influence plant and animal life.

(non-living) factors such as elevation, humidity, and soil type. No matter where they occur on the planet, biomes have similar types of.